• Promote the book on your website, blog, or social networking sites. If you haven’t done this already, include your book’s URL (web address) so if people read about the book on your blog, for example, all they have to do is click to our site to place an order. Consider posting videos of yourself discussing the book or being interviewed about the book. Be as creative as possible!
  • Post information about your book on online listservs, newsgroups, or forums in your field (e.g., H-Net, Humanities Commons). A posting should contain a brief description of the book and a link to the book’s page on the press’s website. It is always best to check the “netiquette” of such forums to be sure they allow for book announcements—some do not.
  • Schedule readings at local bookstores, local libraries, your academic department, or other appropriate venues. Be sure to let your press know the details of these events so they can add them to their online events calendar.
  • Write op-ed pieces relating to your book’s subject matter for your school paper, local paper, the Chronicle of Higher Education, online newsletters like Inside Higher Education, and blogs that deal with either your book’s subject matter or are scholarly in nature (if your book is a scholarly book).
  • If your book has mass-market appeal, consider posting on blogs that deal with pop culture or mass-market topics. Look into becoming a contributor to webzines and blogs like PopMatters and The Conversation—sites that publish reviews, interviews, and detailed essays on cultural studies.
  • Contact your university news bureau and your alumni associations to encourage them to include information about your new book on their websites and in their publications.
  • Encourage the librarian at your institution to purchase a copy of your book for the library’s collection.
  • Attend and present at scholarly meetings. Be sure to let your press know what meetings you will be at and when the meetings are going to be. If your press has a booth at the conference, tell people where they can find it and your book after you present a paper. It is likely that your press will be unable to attend every conference that you attend, but they can often supply you with a flier, perhaps offering a discount to conference attendees, that you can share with your colleagues. Be sure to bring a copy of your book to the meeting to show other scholars.
  • Consider course adoptions. Think about your colleagues or peers who might use your book in their classes. Urge them to request exam copies and use your work in their teaching. Provide a list to your publisher of possible course adopters or academic influencers in your field and urge your press to send them complimentary copies.
  • Keep abreast of current events. Pay attention to news that can serve as a publicity hook for your book and let your publicist know about it.

—AUPresses Faculty Outreach Committee